Random Attrition


iheartchaos:

Super fast magnetic micro robots are the future of manufacturing

Controlled by magnets and sometimes by wire, these teeny tiny robots can be programmed to perform thousands of incredibly precise manufacturing tasks without any expensive, bulky and constraining larger machine set up. Just program them, put them down and let them go.

Submitted by delsyd

— 1 hour ago with 12 notes

cardonna:

Cor Vos’ photos from Roubaix on Cycling Tips.

(via thechurchofcycling)

— 4 hours ago with 35 notes

ktt:

Illuminated Code from Space - Macrocosm and Microcosm by Haari Tesla

An experiment with images of space with tilt shift which resulted in nebulae, galaxies, and supernovae transformed into microorganisms.

Macrocosm and microcosm is an ancient Greek Neo-Platonic schema of seeing the same patterns reproduced in all levels of the cosmos, from the largest all the way down to the smallest scale.

(via distant-traveller)

— 1 day ago with 114219 notes
science-junkie:

theatlantic:

CAPTCHAs Are Becoming Security Theater

CAPTCHAs are a time-worn way for humans to tell computers that we are human. They are those little boxes filled with distorted text that we’ve been told humans can decipher, but computers—the bad guys’ computers—cannot. So, Watson-be-damned, we enter the letters and gain access to whatever is behind the veil, leaving the bad bots steaming outside the pearly, CAPTCHA’d gates. As Google’s ReCAPTCHA website puts it: “Tough on bots, easy on humans.”
It is a satisfying display of human superiority built into the daily experience of the web. And, BONUS, you’re often helping do optical character recognition on old books at the same time. Take that, Machines, you don’t even have any books.
But then along comes Google today noting, in a showily short and breezy blog post, that their machines can beat ReCAPTCHAs 99% of the time.
Read more.


Of course, otherwise it would be hard to explain this. If it was really a war, humans would be outnumbered, hands down.

science-junkie:

theatlantic:

CAPTCHAs Are Becoming Security Theater

CAPTCHAs are a time-worn way for humans to tell computers that we are human. They are those little boxes filled with distorted text that we’ve been told humans can decipher, but computers—the bad guys’ computers—cannot. So, Watson-be-damned, we enter the letters and gain access to whatever is behind the veil, leaving the bad bots steaming outside the pearly, CAPTCHA’d gates. As Google’s ReCAPTCHA website puts it: “Tough on bots, easy on humans.”

It is a satisfying display of human superiority built into the daily experience of the web. And, BONUS, you’re often helping do optical character recognition on old books at the same time. Take that, Machines, you don’t even have any books.

But then along comes Google today noting, in a showily short and breezy blog post, that their machines can beat ReCAPTCHAs 99% of the time.

Read more.

Of course, otherwise it would be hard to explain this. If it was really a war, humans would be outnumbered, hands down.

— 1 day ago with 387 notes

ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 

When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.

But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)

At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  

Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”

Amen to that, Hugh. 

Watch the full talk and performance here »

— 1 day ago with 59980 notes
sorrowfulkain:

"You may abandon your own body but you must preserve your honor." - Miyamoto Musashi

sorrowfulkain:

"You may abandon your own body but you must preserve your honor." - Miyamoto Musashi

(via slawikaruga)

— 1 day ago with 252 notes

Neura gets $2M to bring AI to the internet of things Stacey Higginbotham, gigaom.com
With more than 26 bil­lion (or more) con­nect­ed devices antic­i­pat­ed by 2020, there’s a big ques­tion about how those devices will talk to one anoth­er. But the sci­en­tists behind Neura, a start­up that has offices in both Cal­i­for­nia and…

Neura gets $2M to bring AI to the internet of things
Stacey Higginbotham, gigaom.com

With more than 26 bil­lion (or more) con­nect­ed devices antic­i­pat­ed by 2020, there’s a big ques­tion about how those devices will talk to one anoth­er. But the sci­en­tists behind Neura, a start­up that has offices in both Cal­i­for­nia and…

(Source: smarterplanet)

— 4 days ago with 26 notes
Needy robotic toaster will sell itself if it feels neglected →

iheartchaos:

image

If this is the future, I opt-out.

Brad is the star of ‘Addicted Products,’ a design experiment recently named Best in Show at the 2014 Interaction Awards. As a connected toaster, he’s in constant contact with other connected toasters like him — and thus keenly aware of how much action…

— 4 days ago with 33 notes
iheartchaos:

Earth’s upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there.
Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth’s surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles.
Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.
Now what? Read the whole story over at PopSci…

iheartchaos:

Earth’s upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there.

Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth’s surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles.

Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.

Now what? Read the whole story over at PopSci

— 6 days ago with 2466 notes

tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.

To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»

(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)

(via science-junkie)

— 1 week ago with 12018 notes
If you like Legos and robots, you will love TinkerBots
Signe Brewster, gigaom.com
Kine­mat­ics CEO Matthias Bürger snaps block after block togeth­er. With­in 30 sec­onds, he has formed them into a race­car. He pulls out a remote con­trol app on a tablet and begins direct­ing the car to zoom for­ward and back­ward.The car is …

If you like Legos and robots, you will love TinkerBots
Signe Brewster, gigaom.com

Kine­mat­ics CEO Matthias Bürger snaps block after block togeth­er. With­in 30 sec­onds, he has formed them into a race­car. He pulls out a remote con­trol app on a tablet and begins direct­ing the car to zoom for­ward and back­ward.

The car is …

— 1 week ago