Random Attrition


cyclocosm:

veloclub:

if u are lonely press play

All joking aside, it’s pretty amazing this thing ghost-rode the whoops.

AHAHAHAHAHA

— 13 hours ago with 33 notes
cyclocosm:

aaronandrej:

The aero tuck lookback
skill level: world champion

The best part about this is he starts pedaling again like three seconds later—without coming out of the tuck. 

cyclocosm:

aaronandrej:

The aero tuck lookback

skill level: world champion

The best part about this is he starts pedaling again like three seconds later—without coming out of the tuck. 

— 14 hours ago with 342 notes
jtotheizzoe:

currentsinbiology:


These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack
There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria.
A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D microscopy to identify a new mechanism for bacterial networking. They observed elaborate webs of a common soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, connected by thread-like membranes. This system of cellular pipelines suggests that some bacteria have evolved complex ways to deliver molecular cargo out of sight from snooping neighbors. Their work appears in the journal Environmental Microbiology.

Myxococcus xanthus biofilm devouring a colony of Escherichia coli. Credit: James Berlemanc

Hey look, it’s an article I wrote for WIRED last year popping up on my own dashboard! Circle of life, man.

So cool.

jtotheizzoe:

currentsinbiology:

These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack

There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria.

A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D microscopy to identify a new mechanism for bacterial networking. They observed elaborate webs of a common soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, connected by thread-like membranes. This system of cellular pipelines suggests that some bacteria have evolved complex ways to deliver molecular cargo out of sight from snooping neighbors. Their work appears in the journal Environmental Microbiology.

Myxococcus xanthus biofilm devouring a colony of Escherichia coli. Credit: James Berlemanc

Hey look, it’s an article I wrote for WIRED last year popping up on my own dashboard! Circle of life, man.

So cool.

— 1 day ago with 5438 notes

gibier3000:

Spanish cross scene in the 50’s

(via thechurchofcycling)

— 5 days ago with 360 notes
tiefighters:

Return of the Jedi Pixel Art
Created by noirlac

tiefighters:

Return of the Jedi Pixel Art

Created by noirlac

(via nihileigh)

— 6 days ago with 6057 notes
"One reason that the brain needs an approximate model of attention is that to be able to control something efficiently, a system needs at least a rough model of the thing to be controlled. Another reason is that to predict the behavior of other creatures, the brain needs to model their brain states, including their attention. This theory pulls together evidence from social neuroscience, attention research, control theory and elsewhere. Almost all other theories of consciousness are rooted in our intuitions about awareness. Like the intuition that white light is pure, our intuitions about awareness come from information computed deep in the brain. But the brain computes models that are caricatures of real things. And as with color, so with consciousness: It’s best to be skeptical of intuition."
— 1 week ago with 64 notes
'Giant leap' to type 1 diabetes cure →

wildcat2030:

See on Scoop.it - The future of medicine and health
image

The hunt for a cure for type 1 diabetes has recently taken a “tremendous step forward”, scientists have said.

The disease is caused by the immune system destroying the cells that control blood sugar levels.

A team at Harvard…

— 1 week ago with 31 notes
natelife:

how can you not reblog?

natelife:

how can you not reblog?

— 1 week ago with 131 notes
woodendreams:

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, US (by Alexis Coram)

woodendreams:

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, US (by Alexis Coram)

— 1 week ago with 12466 notes

archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Awesome Natural Phenomena teaches us about yet another amazing form of lightning: Red Sprite Lightning. Slovenian photographer Marko Korošec was chasing storms in Vivaro, Italy when he captured these spectacular images of red sprites flashing above a storm taking place over the central Adriatic sea.

"Sprites are large-scale electrical discharges that occur high above thunderstorm clouds, or cumulonimbus, giving rise to a quite varied range of visual shapes flickering in the night sky. They are triggered by the discharges of positive lightning between an underlying thundercloud and the ground. Sprites appear as luminous reddish-orange flashes. They often occur in clusters within the altitude range 50–90 km (31–56 mi) above the Earth’s surface.”

When red sprites flash they only last for a millisecond, so getting to see their beautiful display preserved in dazzling photos like these is an exceptionally rare treat.

Photos by Marko Korošec via Solent News/SIPA Press

[via Design You Trust and Wikipedia]

(via distant-traveller)

— 1 week ago with 3215 notes

ted:

Here’s what we should talk about when we talk about Ebola.

The first map compares the total deaths caused by disease in every country. The second shows the public health spending of every government. The difference of the two worlds presented speaks for itself.

Learn what the global community can do to fight Ebola»

(via science-junkie)

— 1 week ago with 4413 notes